Archive for August, 2012

The Quest to Become a Delegate to the 1968 G.O.P. Convention — Part II

August 30, 2012

This is Page 1 from a speech my dad gave in April of 1968 in favor of Nelson Rockefeller. More explanation about this is in the previous two posts. The other five pages are also below. (Click on image to enlarge.)

.

.

Happy and Nelson Rockefeller. (From a page in my dad’s scrapbook. Otherwise…source unknown.)

As promised in Part 1, here is my dad’s (Deane Gunderson) speech given to his “Fellow Republicans” at Iowa’s state Republican convention in April 1968. The purposes of the speech: 1) to be selected as a delegate to the national convention held later that year and 2) to promote Nelson Rockefeller, the G.O.P.’s candidate in the 1968 presidential election. (For those of you perhaps too young to recall, Richard Nixon won the nomination and the election, and later, under duress, resigned from the presidency.)

In the spring of 1968 when my dad gave this speech, I was in 7th grade. I remember nothing from that time pertaining to this speech or to my dad attending the convention (as an alternate delegate) in Florida. I do, however, remember in later years (late ’70s? early ’80s?) sitting with my mom at the round oak kitchen table as my dad (on the school board at the time) presented to us, his “school board” audience, at least one persuasive speech. To some of you readers, the topic might ring a bell. It had to do with the then Rolfe school’s superintendent named John Harrington. Remembering my dad’s passion to get that speech perfected in order to convince the school board, I can only imagine the drive and passion he put into his G.O.P. “delegate” speech.

To see a photo of Iowa’s 1968 delegation, including my dad as an alternate delegate, click here. In that same post is an audio clip of my dad briefly telling about his involvement in politics.

.

* * * * * * * *

To enlarge the thumbnails below and/or to view them in slideshow view, click on any one of them. After clicking on any thumbnail, to enlarge it even further, click on the “View Full Size” link.

I think what my dad says about the press on Page 5 and continued into Page 6 is particularly interesting.

.

.

* * * * * * * *

(Click here to go to Louise Gunderson Shimon’s blog’s home page.)

Advertisements

The Quest to Become a Delegate to the 1968 G.O.P. Convention — Part I

August 28, 2012

In April of 1968 my dad, Deane Gunderson, gave a speech to his “fellow Republicans” at Iowa’s state Republican convention. He gave the speech in hopes of being selected to be a delegate to the G.O.P.’s national convention held in August of 1968.

Prior to giving his April ’68 speech, he sent a letter to those “fellow Republicans” letting them know of his interest in becoming a delegate to the national convention. That letter is included below. It is from a page of a scrapbook my mom made for my dad’s 80th birthday.

I’ll post my dad’s speech later this week.

In the most recent post I included a newspaper clipping giving the names of the Iowa delegates and alternate delegates to the 1968 G.O.P. National Convention.

.

.

This is the letter my dad sent in 1968 to his “fellow Republicans” prior to Iowa’s state Republican convention. (Click on image to enlarge.)

.

* * * * * * * *

(Click here to go to Louise Gunderson Shimon’s blog’s home page.)

1968 G.O.P. Convention: The Iowa Delegation

August 27, 2012

My dad, Deane Gunderson, was an alternate delegate to the 1968 Republican National Convention held in Miami Beach, Florida.

Prior to the national convention held in August of 1968, Iowa’s state convention was held in Des Moines in April of that same year. At that state convention, my dad gave a speech in his quest to be selected as a delegate to the national convention. Instead of being selected to be a delegate, he was an alternate delegate. He is included in the delegation photo shown below. National Committeewoman Mary Louise Smith is also included in the photo.

My mom’s, Marion Gunderson, handwriting is across the top of the newspaper clipping. Her writing indicates my dad was “strongly for Rockefeller” and that the clipping is from an August 1968 issue of the Des Moines Tribune.

Later this week I’ll post my dad’s 1968 speech.

In case you missed the earlier posting of my dad briefly telling of his involvement in politics, that audio clip is here: D.C.G. Republican Experiences

.

My dad, Deane Gunderson, is included in this group of Iowa delegates, including alternates, to the 1968 G.O.P. convention.  He is seated in the fourth row to the (photograph viewer’s) right of the lady wearing glasses. (Click on image to enlarge. Click twice to magnify further.)

.

* * * * * * * *

(Click here to go to Louise Gunderson Shimon’s blog’s home page.)

Corn Combining in Iowa … by August 24th???

August 25, 2012

This post’s photos of the golden combined corn field were taken yesterday (August 24, 2012) just north of Churdan, Iowa, in Greene County. The photo of the lush green corn field was taken eleven days prior (August 13) about fifty miles further northwest in Pocahontas County. What a contrast, almost entirely due to the different amounts of precipitation, in fields just fifty miles apart.

Corn combining in Iowa usually doesn’t start until mid-September (and even then, it is a little early). Widespread combining in Iowa in August, like the state is experiencing in 2012, is extremely rare.

Aside from small pockets in the state of Iowa that were blessed to receive more timely rains, the larger area in the state of Iowa that did receive those more timely rains is the four-county area including Pocahontas, Buena Vista, Palo Alto and Clay counties, and the fringe areas of adjacent counties. (Otherwise, aside from those pockets, four counties and fringes, the rest of Iowa is in a serious state of drought.)

In general, states across the Cornbelt experienced similar drought conditions like that shown in these photos where combining has already occurred, and sometimes much worse (although Minnesota fared better than some of the other Cornbelt states). In some areas the corn fields are in such a bad state they are chopped instead of combined.

.

August 24, 2012: About two miles north of Churdan, Iowa, in Greene County. This field is in a severe drought area. (Click once on the image to enlarge; twice to further enlarge.)

.

The photo immediately below was taken eleven days earlier (August 13). Because they were not taken on the same day, admittedly the photos are not comparing apples to apples. Still, the contrast due to the above (Greene County) photo being in a drought area and the (Pocahontas County) photo below being in an area receiving more timely rains is obvious.

.

August 13, 2012: Section 24, Roosevelt Township, Pocahontas County, Iowa. While this field/area has received less-than-typical precipitation in 2012, this field is not in a severe drought area. (Photo taken by Abby Shimon. Click on the image to enlarge; click twice to magnify the almost-full ears.)

.

Click on any thumbnail to enlarge the image and/or to move through the images in slideshow view. After clicking on a thumbnail, to enlarge the photo even more, click on the “View Full Size” link.

.

.

* * * * * * * *

(Click here to go to Louise Gunderson Shimon’s blog’s home page.)

Pocahontas County, Iowa, Pre-1900 Keystone Bridge: 1968, 1981 and 2004

August 19, 2012

In 1968 my mother (Marion Gunderson) painted, while on location, this Keystone Bridge watercolor. At that time the bridge was one mile west, one mile south, and another quarter mile west of Gilmore City, Iowa. In 1981 the bridge was moved about eight miles south to its current location of Coopers Cove County Park in Pocahontas County, Iowa. In Mother’s and Daddy’s 1992 oral history, Mother said about this Keystone Bridge painting, “I guess one of the best paintings I ever did was of the keystone bridge down by Gilmore City. … When I was painting the keystone bridge, I was sitting on a folding chair and fell down the hill!” (Click on image to enlarge.)

.

.

In my most recent post, I included the 1968 Rolfe, Iowa, school yearbook paired with Mother’s (Marion Gunderson) watercolors from that same year. One of those watercolors (above) is of a keystone bridge when it was located southwest of Gilmore City, Iowa. In 1981 that bridge was moved about eight miles to its current Pocahontas County, Iowa, location at Coopers Cove County Park*.

An explanation regarding how the Romans relied upon a keystone in bridge design is here.

This next image** gives an explanation regarding the Iowa bridge in Mother’s watercolor.

.

Click twice on this image to magnify the text and photos.

.

The following image is from the November 17, 1980, issue of The Rolfe Arrow. It includes an editorial about the bridge preservation project. The last paragraph refers to “the father of Ed Shelgren” helping to build the bridge prior to 1900. I believe Ed’s father was the grandfather of Nancy (Shelgren) Martin.

.

On this Rolfe Arrow November 27, 1980, page, the “History Was Made” editorial provides color commentary regarding discussion prior to the moving of the keystone bridge. (Click twice on the image to magnify text.)

.

.

Included in the thumbnail images below are photos of the bridge at its current location. The photos were taken by my sister, Peggy, in June of 2004.

Click on any of the thumbnail images to enlarge them and/or to see the images in slideshow view.

.

.

* * * * * * * *

The banner across the top of the Rolfe Public Library’s web site shows another Pocahontas County bridge that I believe is a keystone bridge. It is on the east edge of Rolfe and is visible from Clinton-Garfield Cemetery.

*Features of Coopers Cove County Park are listed here.

**Page 119 of Pocahontas County, Iowa History, compiled in 1981 by the Pocahontas County Historical Society Members and Friends

(Click here to go to Louise Gunderson Shimon’s blog’s home page.)

1968: Marion Gunderson’s Watercolors and Rolfe, Iowa, School Yearbook

August 9, 2012

This page is from the May 23, 1968, issue of the Rolfe Arrow archives at http://rolfe.advantage-preservation.com.* (Click on image twice to magnify.)

.

At the end of this post are directions for locating the newspaper article telling about the Rolfe girls’ state meet win.**

* * * * * * * *

.

In the gallery below is the Rolfe, Iowa, school yearbook for 1967-68 … my 7th-grade year.

For other Rolfe yearbooks, go to this blog’s home page. At that page, on the right of the screen is a column of “Categories.” In the main category of “Iowa” there is a subcategory of “Rolfe” in which there is a subcategory of “Yearbook.” That sub-category of “Yearbook” is further divided into decades, so far including “1940s,” “1950s” and “1960s.” My hope is to post all of the Rolfe yearbooks by Rolfe’s July 12-14, 2013, sesquicentennial. During the sesquicentennial the Rolfe all-school reunion will also take place.

In the gallery of thumbnail images in this post are images of three watercolors painted by Mother (Marion Gunderson) in 1968. As far as I know, unlike many other years, Mother did not journal in 1968. Therefore, I don’t have any journal entries documenting anything regarding these three paintings.

.

.

Making the Thumbnail Images Larger

1) To see the thumbnail images in slideshow view, click on one of the images. Then navigate forward or backward through the images.

2) To magnify the images even more, once in slideshow view, click on the “Permalink” OR “View Full Size” hyperlink.

3) After clicking on the “Permalink”  OR “View Full Size” hyperlink, if you want to enlarge further, hover your mouse cursor over the image. As you move the cursor over the image, if you see a moving “+” sign, it means you can enlarge the image even further by clicking on it. (A “-” sign means you can’t enlarge it further.)

 

.

.

* * * * * * * *

*101 years (1888-1989) of Rolfe newspapers are online at www.rolfe.advantage-preservation.com. The Rolfe Public Library endorsed this newspaper project; I’ve acted as liaison between the library and Advantage Companies that did the digitizing and is hosting the files. If you notice something that needs to be changed, you may report it by either contacting the company directly, or you may let me know and I can relay it to my contact there.

It is important to note that there *will* be a “Help” link at the link for the newspaper archives. It just might take a little time. In the meantime, if you have questions related to searching, feel free to let me know.

**To locate the article about the Rolfe girls’ state meet win, follow these directions for searching by date: 1) go to the newspaper site, 2) under “Year” click on “show more,” 3) click on “1968,” 4) under “Month” click “May,” 5) under “Day” click on “23,” 6) click on the “hit” that ends with “Page 1.” When there you have the option to arrow forward and backward through that issue’s pages, including the page/image shown at the top of this blog post.

You may also conduct keyword searches.

(Click here to go to Louise Gunderson Shimon’s blog’s home page.)

The (short version) Story of Marion Gunderson: Marion the Librarian and So Much More

August 1, 2012

Every time I include Mother’s (Marion Gunderson) name in a blog post, I want to hyperlink her name to the “story” of her life. So, here is her obituary that I will link to in the future. Once I add more links to make her obituary more interactive, I’ll repost it.

* * * * * * * *

Marion Loomis Abbott Gunderson 1919-2004. This photo was taken in July of 1991.

Marion Loomis Abbott, daughter of James Thompson Abbott and Helen Margaret (Loomis) Abbott, was born on September 27, 1919, in Ogden, Utah. She graduated from Ogden High School in 1937 and received a B.S. in Applied Art from Iowa State College in 1941.

On July 23, 1941, Marion Abbott and Deane Charles Gunderson were married in Ogden. They resided in Waterloo, Iowa, for nearly four years while Deane worked for the John Deere Tractor Company. In 1945, they moved to the farm southwest of Rolfe where they continued to live for six decades.

For many years Marion painted watercolors and exhibited in galleries across from the state. In 1963, Marion accepted a position as assistant librarian at the Rolfe Public Library and later became head librarian. She worked at the library until her retirement in 1998. Marion taught Vacation Bible School at the Rolfe Presbyterian Church, was a Cub Scout den mother, 4-H leader and kindergarten volunteer. She spearheaded several community projects including a flea market to raise money to build the Rolfe swimming pool, an oral history project consisting of interviews of 100 Rolfe citizens, and microfilming and indexing The Rolfe Arrow. She provided the impetus for the new Rolfe library/community center/city hall building.

Marion was an avid reader, a Life Master of the American Contract Bridge League, and an ardent genealogist. In 2000, The Iowa Genealogical Society honored Marion for her volunteer work. She was a member of the Shared Ministry of Rolfe, Sorosis, and Chapter FR, P.E.O. She served on the State Extension Advisory Committee and the Board of Directors of the Iowa State University Alumni Association. In 1980, Iowa State University awarded Alumni Recognition Medals to Marion and Deane.

Marion was preceded in death by her parents and one son,, Christian Abbott Gunderson. She is survived by her husband Deane; son Charles Gunderson and wife Gloria; daughters Clara Hoover and husband Harold, Helen Gunderson, Martha Carlson and husband Michael, Margaret Moore and husband Jeffrey, and Louise Shimon and husband William; seven grandchildren Christina Wehmeyer, Timothy Gunderson, Kevin Carlson, Joshua Moore, Jonathan Moore, Abigail Johnstone and Kathryn Shimon; and a cousin Kathryn Dye.

Through her paintings, community efforts and example as woman, wife, mother, grandmother and friend, the spirit of Marion the Librarian is very much alive.

* * * * * * * *

(Click here to go to Louise Gunderson Shimon’s blog’s home page.)