Oregon: Day #4 — The Natural Bridges (and a little of Day #5)

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(Click here to go to this blog’s home page.  Previous posts about Oregon are in this blog’s “travel” archives.)

Click map to enlarge.

Click map to enlarge.

On the map at the left, the green marker line shows our day #4 route from Oregon’s Brookings to Gold Beach and then back to Brookings. We spent night #3 and night #4 (July 19th and 20th) in Brookings.

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Click photo to enlarge.

Click photo to enlarge.

In the photo at the left I believe Bill and I are at the Pistol River State Park near the mouth of the Pistol River.  It was quite foggy on our day #4 drive, making it difficult to have a clear view of many of the sights, but still very worth the drive.  On day #5 (July 21st) we backtracked, once again driving north from Brookings on a much clearer day.

Bill on the trail toward the Natural Bridges Cove at Samuel H. Boardman State Park.  Click photo to enlarge.

Bill on the trail toward the Pacific Ocean, more specifically the Natural Bridges Cove at Samuel H. Boardman State Park. Click photo to enlarge.

The U.S. 101 route from Brookings to Gold Beach is only about 28 miles. Bill and I drove that route fairly directly on day #4 so we could arrive in Gold Beach in time for lunch.  After lunch, we lollygagged as we stopped frequently to sightsee on our way back to Brookings.  A myriad of trails and informational placards led us to gorgeous natural sights.

According to Frommer’s Oregon*, “No other stretch of U.S. 101 along the Oregon coast is more breathtaking than the segment between Gold Beach and Brookings.  This remote coastline is dotted with offshore islands, natural rock arches, sea caves, bluffs, and beaches.  Take your time, stop at the many pull-offs, and make this a leisurely all-day drive.”

Oregon's coastal Natural Bridges on a foggy day #4, July 20th.  Click photo to enlarge.

Oregon's coastal Natural Bridges on a foggy day #4, July 20th. Click photo to enlarge.

Because there was such dense and constant fog on day #4, sightseeing was clearer on day #5 when there was only patchy fog. The photos at the right and immediately below show the contrast of our view of the Natural Bridges. The photo at the right was taken when it was obviously very foggy on Day #4.  The photo below was taken on Day #5.

The same Natural Bridges on a clear Day #5.  Click photo to enlarge.

The same Natural Bridges on a clear Day #5. Almost the exact center of this photo is shown in more detail below. Click photo to enlarge.

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A closeup of a portion of the Natural Bridges.  At the lower left is a little fountain in the rock from which water frequently gushed.  Click photo to enlarge.

A closeup of a portion of the Natural Bridges. At the lower left is a little fountain in the rock from which water frequently gushed. Click photo to enlarge.

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* Frommer’s Oregon, 6th edition, published by Wiley Publishing, copyright 2008, p. 7.

(Click here to go to this blog’s home page. In the next few weeks there will be more frequent posts about Mother’s — Marion Gunderson’s — watercolors/exhibits as well as most likely more about Mr. Spaulding.)

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3 Responses to “Oregon: Day #4 — The Natural Bridges (and a little of Day #5)”

  1. Clara Says:

    This photo is lovely. It could be one you send with Christmas cards.

  2. Clara Says:

    The photo of you and Bill at the mouth of Pistol River.

  3. Peg Says:

    Wow, so much to comment on! STUNNING photo of you and Bill. The fog, to monochromatic “colors,” not another soul in sight, bare feet, great expressions, and even NW gear. Way to go. (Did you use a tripod?

    The contrasting with- and without-fog photos. Wow. what a difference just the natural elements (beyond your control) make in a photograph. And, obviously, in viewing something in real life. How great you were able to make the drive a second day. Did that mean you had to give up something else? Probably **well**-worth it, though, from the amazing Frommer’s description: “No other stretch of U.S. 101 along the Oregon coast is more breathtaking than the segment between Gold Beach and Brookings. This remote coastline is dotted with offshore islands, natural rock arches, sea caves, bluffs, and beaches. Take your time, stop at the many pull-offs, and make this a leisurely all-day drive.” What a lifetime experience!

    And that last/close-up photo. Just so beautiful. When I’m not just taking things for granted, it amazes me that our world contains features like this. Wow.

    Favorite word: “lollygagged.” 🙂 Good for you, the writer! And good for you two, the lollygaggers! 🙂

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