Mr. Spaulding and His Charges: Prologue

by

(Click here to go to this blog’s home page.)

If you aren’t aware of Mr. Spaulding (Dave Spaulding), you’d probably have fun reading about him in the previous posts.  The first post about him, posted on July 29th, describes him as a teacher and includes several comments from his former students.  Also, scattered in the previous posts are three photos of him.

During August and September, Mr. Spaulding and I had three conversations about his experiences with explosives.  I combined the three conversations into one transcript.  I’ll post that transcript in six parts beginning tomorrow, September 16th.

Hopefully you can appreciate that Mr. Spaulding and I do not want to risk having transcript details about explosives fall into the wrong hands…and subsequently be used inappropriately.  Because of our wanting to be careful, I have omitted portions of the transcript.  As you read, you’ll be able to see where I have omitted a word or explanation.

In the transcript, the blank lines (i.e., __________ ) indicate where a word (or two words) was “bleeped” out.  The “bleeped” out word is usually the name of a chemical or product Mr. Spaulding used.

Also in the transcript, whenever there are squared brackets [   ], it means I omitted one or more sentences in which Mr. Spaulding gave details about a chemical(s) and/or a product(s) and/or a process he used as he worked with explosives.

I realize the blanks and the brackets don’t allow insight to the full robust of the conversations.  My main purpose for posting the transcript is not so readers have a chemistry lesson, but, instead so we can learn more about Mr. Spaulding.  Hopefully, even with the omissions, that purpose will be accomplished.

I emailed the finished product, including blanks and brackets, to Mr. Spaulding to see if he thought it would be easy enough for people to follow.  Clever as always, he replied with, “Knowing what was missing in the blanks made it simple.  To the neophyte, however, it might seem that the writer was afflicted with amentia.”  (Off to the dictionary I went!)

Stay tuned.  The first of six parts will be posted by tomorrow night.

* * * * *

By the way, tomorrow is my father’s 91st birthday.

(Click here to go to this blog’s home page.)

Advertisements

Tags:

One Response to “Mr. Spaulding and His Charges: Prologue”

  1. Peg Says:

    “Clever as always, he replied with, ‘Knowing what was missing in the blanks made it simple. To the neophyte, however, it might seem that the writer was afflicted with amentia.'” Love it! 🙂

    (Off to the dictionary I went!) Love it, too! 🙂

    Oh, yes, and “the full robust”–great wordsmithing!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: